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Criminal offending

CRIMINAL OFFENDING

Criminal offending in childhood and young adulthood is correlated with poor current and future wellbeing in a range of areas. This indicator looks at offending rates where children and young people are the perpetrators of crime.

Offending is correlated with poor future wellbeing outcomes for the child or young person committing the crime. Children and young people who have come into contact with the youth justice system are 6.7 times more likely to end up with a corrections sentence by age 34, 3.3 times more likely to end up receiving long-term benefit support, 2.3 times more likely to need mental health or addiction services or pharmaceuticals, and 2.7 times less likely to have basic school qualifications*.

This indicator looks at offending rates where children and young people are the perpetrators of crime. It measures the number of distinct children and young people (ages 10-20) with criminal charges as a proportion of the total population.

Most children and young people who offend are also experiencing poor wellbeing in other areas of their life. The majority of children who offend, particularly those committing more serious offences, are also not attending or not achieving at school, have learning difficulties or mental health issues, come from homes experiencing poverty or material hardship, and/or have been exposed to family violence. When a child or young person breaks the law, the youth justice system carefully considers the age and any family issues that may be affecting their safety and behaviour. The aim is to work with them in a way that provides an opportunity to change their lives for the better without getting a criminal record, and to make positive strides forward.

This indicator relates to the 'involved and empowered' outcome.

How will we measure this?

  • This indicator draws on administrative data provided by the New Zealand Police.
  • This indicator will be updated in annually in September.

For more information

Last updated: 
Thursday, 23 July 2020